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Full text of "The beamer : Bradford Durfee Textile School yearbook"



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r ADORESS ^ 
IBRADFORO DU&FEE TECHNICAL iNSIflU 
— FALL RIVER, MASS. 




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BRADFORD DURFEE 
TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

FALL RIVER + MASSACHUSETTS 




We Dedicate . . . 

During the past four years I have become well 
acquainted with most of you, and the association has 
been to me most pleasant. In your stay at college, I 
sincerely hope that you have gained the knowledge 
you have sought and that it will help you materially 
in the years to come. 

While you are leaving us in a time of turmoil, we 
all believe that in time conditions will be improved 
and the true American standard of living will prevail. 

I wish you all a very hapov and prosperous future. 

William H. Wing ate 



Your undergraduate studies at Bradford Durfee 
Technical Institute are over. The education obtained 
here, which has been offered with the purpose of assist- 
ing you in perpetuating, improving and realizing sig- 
nificant democratic ideals, has given you many power- 
ful tools. The college's effort of keeping abreast of the 
rapid changes taking place in the social and industrial 
life has sharpened these tools and made them ready 
to be used. 

As your advisor and friend, I wish to express my 
hopes that the educative process has really provided 
you with those tools which not only will aid you 
to adapt yourself to your environment and furnish 
you with the technical preparation necessary for earn- 
ing a living, but also will inspire you to think inde- 
pendently and constructively, to widen vour horizons 
of intellectual endeavor, cultural interests and recre- 
ational pursuits. 

Louis Simeone 





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FACULTY 




A Message 

from, the 

President 






The keynote of the commencement address in 1951 was "Making 
Tracks." This yearbook is a record of some of the "tracks" which you 
have had a part in making. It will be the means, in the years to come, 
of recalling them. 

The Alumni of the Institute can help to insure its continued 
progress by spreading information about the high quality of educa- 
tional opportunity to be found right here in Fall River, Massachusetts. 
You can point with real satisfaction to alumni who are successfully 
pursuing graduate studies; who are in responsible positions in industry; 
or who are successful in the field of education. Many of them were in 
college with you. Some are your own classmates. 

Bricks and mortar, a new science building, new equipment, even 
a highly competent staff does not necessarily make a strong institution. 
True, they are all an important part of the picture as a whole. In the 
final analysis, however, it is you, the alumni, who are the deciding 
factor. "By their deeds ye shall know them." How very true! So I 
give you this one last word. Carry on to the very best of your ability 
in order that your alma mater may continue to grow in usefulness to 
America— the land we all love so well. 



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DR. JAMES WATTERS 

B.S., M.S., Sc.D. 

Professor and Chairman of 

Chemistry Department 




RUDOLPH LA VAULT, Ed.B., Ed.M. 

Associate Professor in 

Social Sciences 




rxENNdTH C. TEDFORD, B.F.A. 

Instructor in Art and 

Product Development 





DR. ALEXANDER SEVERINO 

B.S., Ed.M., Ed.D. 

Professor - Chairman of the Art & 

Product Development Department 




JOHN STICKLER 

Associate Professor and Chairman 

of Textile Department 




EUGENE ROBIE WILLIAMS 

B S. 

instructor in Engineering 




Faculty 

Bradford Durfee 
Technical Institute 




JOHN W. NORMAN 

Associate Professor in 

Weaving Department 




R03ERT E. COOPER 

Instruztor in Weaving and 

Physical Testing 





JOHN W. FERGUSON 

Instructor in Carding and 

Spinning 




BERTRAM B. HARDY, B.S. 
Instructor in Electrical Engineering 



CLAUDE W. WAGNER, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Chemistry 



FREDERICK WINTER, A.B., M.A. 
Assistant Professor in English 



JOHN J. CRAWFORD 
Instructor in Machine Shop 



Faculty 

Bradford Durfee 
Technical Institute 




ALBERT A. STEWART, B.S. 
Assistant Professor in Physics 





LEROY L. SMITH, B.F.A., M.A. 

Instructor of Art and Product 

Development 




SAMUEL A. STONE, B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 




LOUIS S. J. SIMEONE, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Mathematics 





WILLIAM H. WINGATE 

Assistant Professor 
in Dyeing and Finishing 




WALTER E. MARSTON 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 




JOHN GREENHALGH 

Instructor in Art and Product 

Development 




MISS JACQUELINE P. URBAN 
Senior Bookeeper • 



MISS MARGARET E. MORGAN 
Accountant and Treasurer 




FRANK DILLON, B.S. 

Professor and Chairman 

of Engineering Department 




HAROLD C. SMITH 

Associate Professor in Carding 

and Spinning 




WALTER J. CASS, A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in English and German 




.. JUT- "." ; ;• 
MISS FIDELIA D. DAVOL 
A.B., M.A. 
Clerk - Stenographer 






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SENIORS 



Senior Class History 




Three years and eight months ago, we the 
Class of 1952, brought forth upon this institute, 
the largest freshman class ever to enroll as 
degree-seeking students, conceived in educa- 
tion, and dedicated to the proposition that all 
men will be of greater service to their country, 
armed not with guns, but armed with know- 
ledge with which to help their fellow men live 
more comfortably in peace. 

Now we are engaged in the great struggle 
of receiving that knowledge, testing whether 
we, or any other college students, so conceived 
and so dedicated, can long endure and emerge 
triumphant with the education received in that 
struggle, Soon we will gather to honor those 
men and women who have conqne - ed the fun- 
damental concepts of their studies. It is alto- 
gether fitting and proper that we do this, for 
of the one hundred and ten freshmen enrolled 
in the class of "52", there remain only fifty-one 
to be so honored. 



Future classes will little note, nor long re- 
member what we said here, but they can never 
forget what we have done here. The class of 
"52" has consecrated its past, far above the 
poor powers of those who follow to add to or 
detract from their illustrious achievements. 
Never again may a class claim the distinction 
of being the first class to enroll in the Insti- 
tute, knowing that at the conclusion of their 
four year course of studies they would receive 
the Bachelor of Science Degree. Future classes 
may gain prestige in many ways, but never in 
claiming to be the inaugurators of the intra- 
mural bowling league, started by members of 
this class in October 1949, or the tennis team, 
started in March 1950, or the fencing team, 
started in February 1950. It is for these fu- 
ture classes to dedicate themselves to building 
upon these things which we have thus far so 
nobly advanced. 

For we, the Class of "52", the great task re- 
maining is to dedicate ourselves to taking our 
positions in the industrial world, and to aid 
the Institute, that these aforementioned deeds 
shall not have been accomplished in vain. 






AMERICO ALMEIDA 
B.S., Chemistry 



EVERETT S. ARNOLD 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





JOHN R. AYLWARD 
B.S., Chemistry 



OMER L. BERGERON 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





PHILIP BERNHEIM 
B.S., Textile Engineering 



DANA BINKOFF 
B.S., Textile Engineering 






EARL BILSKY 
B.S., Textile Engineering 




FRANK R. BORGES, JR. 
.$., Mechanical Engineering 








ROGER B. BRIDGE 
B.S., Mechanical Engineering 




EDWARD P. BURKE 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





FRANK CIVILIKAS 
B.S., Mechanical Engineering 








THOMAS J. CONNELLY 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





PATRICIA COOPER 
B.S., Textile Styling 




EVEREST CORREA 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





LOUIS F. FAY AN, JR. 
IS., Textile Engineering 



GLENN GELLIS 
B.S., Textile Styling 





ALBERT H. HICKS 
B.S., Mechanical Engineering 




ERNEST HOWARTH 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





RAYMOND J. HRYCIW 
B.S., Civil Engineering 



EDWARD LARCHEVESQUE 
B.S., Civil Engineering 







EDWARD R. LAVAGNINO 
B.S., Chemistry 



EDWARD F. LEVELL 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





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GEORGE MACKIE 
B.S., Chemistry and Dyeing 



ROBERT MARTIN 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





DAVID MOITOZO 
B.S., Textile Engineering 



ERNEST MONIZ 
B.S., Textile Engineering 







CORNELIUS J. MURPHY, JR. 
B.S., Chemistry 



MUtm 

FRANCIS E. NASSER 
B.S., Electrical Engineering 




CHUKWUEMEKA EZEJI-OKOYE 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





WILLIAM R. O'NEIL 
B.S., Mechanical Engineering 





PHILBERT POULIN 
B.S., Electrical Engineering 




WALTER M. RAK 
B.S., Electrical Engineering 






JOSEPH RAPOSA 
B.S., Textile Engineering 



JOHN D. RAPOZA 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





HENRY N. REIS 
B.S., Textile Engineering 



ROBERT F. RODMAN 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





SHLOMO ROSENBAUM 
B.S., Chemistry and Dyeing 



NORMAN J. ROY 
B.S., Civil Engineering 






PAUL G. ST. LAURENT 
B.S., Mechanical Engineering 



ROGER A. SHERMAN 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





JOSEPH A. SULLIVAN, JR. 
B.S., Textile Styling 




ALAN M. SUSSMAN 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





MANUEL J. VIVEIROS 
B.S., Civil Engineering 




JACK WACHSBERGER 
B.S., Textile Engineering 





NORMAN B. WEINSTEIN 
B.S., Chemistry and Dyeing 



HERBERT A. WEISMAN 
B.S., Textile Engineering 







RUSSELL WILKEY 
B.S., Textile Engineering 



FREDERICK J. WOOD 
B.S., Mechanical Engineering 




V/ARREN M. WOOD 
B.S., Electrical Engineering 




MENELAOS YANKOPOULOS 
B.S., Chemistry and Dyeing 



Senior Directory and Activities 



AMERICO ALMEIDA 

1751 North Main St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

AATCC 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Cosmopolitan 
Club 1, 4; A.C.S. 1, 2, 4; Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; 
Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 4. 

EVERETT S. ARNOLD 
422 Rochester St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Junior Warden 4; Class Presi- 
dent 2; Vice President Athletic end Social Union 
3; Soccer 4; Varsity Club 4. 

JOHN R. AYLWARD 
240 Center St. 
Somerset Center, Mass. 

A.C.S. 2, 3, Chairman 4; Dean's List 1. 2 

OMER L. BERGERON 

212 Barlow St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 3, Vice President 4; 
Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Year Book Staff. 

PHILIP BERNHEIM 

2 rue du Frene Mulhouse 
Haut-Rhin, France 

Cosmopolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 4. 

DANA BINROFF 

1542-39th Street 
Brooklyn 18, N. Y. 

Soccer 1, 4; Tennis 2, 4; Baseball I; Bowling 
2, 3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant Editor Distaff 4; Year 
Book Staff; Advertising Editor; Fencing 3. 

EARL BH.SKY 

163 Grove St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 4; Corresponding Scribe 3; 
AATCC 3, 4; Sophomore Secretary-Treasurer; 
Senior Vice-President; Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; 
New England Textile Foundation Scholarship 4. 

FRANK R. BORGES JR. 

170 Harbor Terrace 
Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 3, 4\ Engineering Society; Class Secre- 
tary 2. 

ROGER B. BRIDGE 

135 Grove Ave. 
Somerset Centre, Mass. 

Engineering Society; Bowling League; President 
Student Council; Class Officer 3; Senior Class 
President. 

EDWARD P. BURKE 

335 Birch St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

FRANK CIVILIKAS 

199 Purchase St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Engineering Society 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, 
President 4; Bowling 4\ Dean's List 2. 

THOMAS J. CONNELLY JR. 

253 Buffinton St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Baseball 2 ,4; Bowling 2, 3, 4. 

PATRICIA COOPER 

Little Britain Road 
Newburgh, New York 

Kappa Sigma Phi 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, 3, Presi- 
dent 4; Student Council 3 ; Representative of 
Art Department, Secretary; Alethea Staff, Art 
Director. 



EVEREST CORREA 
439 Kilburn St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 1 , 2, 3, 4; Bowling 2, 3; Varsity Club 4; 
Soccer 4, Captain 4. 

LOUIS F. FAYAN JR. 
Gardners Neck Rd. 
So. Swansea, Mass. 

Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Senior Warden 3; Clas 
President 3; Student Council 3, 4; Dean's List 

1, 2, 3, 4; Bowling League 1, 2, 3. 

GLEN GELLIS 

131-29 229th St. 

Laurelton, N. Y. 

Manager Baseball 7; Distaff 1, 2, 3, 4, Busi- 
ness Manager 1, Ed tor in Chief 2, 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2, 4; Yearbook Art Editor 2; Epsilon Phi 
Pi 1,2, 3, 4; Art Club 4; Bowling 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 2; New England Textile Foundation 
Scholarship 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ALBERT HILTON HICKS 
38 Hambly St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Engineering Society I, 2, 3, 4; Bowling 4. 

ERNEST HOWARTH 

1289 No. High St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity I, 2, 3, 4, President 
4; Soccer Manager 1, 4; Athletic Association 
Secretary 2; Vice President Sophomo-e Class; 
Bowling 1, 2, 3; Dean's List 1, 2. 

RAYMOND J. HRYCIW 
33 Hall Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

Epsilon Phi Pi 3, 4; Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2,3, 4; 
Dean's List 1. 

EDWARD LARCHEVESQUE 

67 Lapham St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 

2, 3, 4; Bowling 3, 4. 

EDWARD R. LAVAGNINO 

148 Ocean View Ave. 
Swansea, Mass. 

Epsilon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; AATCC 7, 2, 3, 4; 
ACS. 4; Bowling 7, 2, 4. 

EDWARD FRANCIS LEVELL 

24 No. Seventh St. 

Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 2 3, 4; Bowling 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 
President 4; Basketball 1 , 2, 4; Varsity Club 4; 
Soccer Manager 4. 

GEORGE MACKIE 

153 Foster St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

AATCC 1, 2, 3, 4; A.C.S. 4; Bowling 1, 2. 

ROBERT MARTIN 

366 Washington St. 
West Warwick, R. I. 

Baseball 2; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4. 

DAVID MOITOZO 

12 Highland St. 
Taunton, Mass. 

Phi Psi 3, 4; Fencing 2, 3; Senior Class Secre- 
tary; Yearbook Staff. 

ERNEST MONIZ 
269 Fountain St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 3, 4; New England Textile Foundation 
Scholarship 4. 



CORNELIUS JOSEPH MURPHY JR. 

70 E. Prospect St. 
Waldwick, N. J. 

Dean's List 2, 3; ACS. 3, 4; Varsity Club 
3, 4, Vice President 4; Cosmopolitan Club 3, 4, 
Vice President 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 4, Pledge- 
master 3, Vice Chancellor 4; Distaff 3, 4; Ath- 
letic and Social Union (Representative at Large), 
President 4; Soccer 3, 4; Basketball 1,2,3, 4, 
Captain 4; Alethea 4, Literary Editor; Bowling 

1, 2, Treasurer 2; New England Textile Founda- 
tion Scholarship I, 2, 3, 4. 

FRANCIS E. NASSER 
208 New Boston Rd. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi I, 2, 3, 4; Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; 
Bowling League I, 3, 4; Student Council 4; 
Dean's List 2, 3; Baseball 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4 

CHUKWUEMEKA EZEJI-OKOYE 

Port Harcourt, Nigeria 

Epsilon Phi Pi 3, 4; Cosmopolitan Club 3, 4, 
President 4; Yearbook Staff; Dean's List 3, 4; 
Fencing 3. 

WILLIAM RICHARD O'NEIL 

175 So. Beach St. 
Fal' River, Mass. 

Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 3, 4; 
Basketball I, 3, 4, Captain 4; Varsity Club I, 

2, 3, 4; Bowling 3, 4; Yearbook Staff; Distaff 3. 

PHILBERT POULIN 

131 Central Ave. 
New Bedford, Mass. 

Engineering Society 2, 3, 4. 

WALTER M. RAK 

20 Wilcox St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 
4; Soccer 1, 2, 4; Varsity Club 1,2,3, 4; Dean's 
List 1, 2, 3. 

JOSEPH RAPOSA 

195 Middle St. 

Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Senior Warden 4; Soccer 4; 
Bowling 3, 4; Treasurer of Senior Class; Year- 
book Staff; Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4. 

JOHN D. RAPOZA 
168 Barnaby St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Fencing 2, 3; Soccer 1; Phi Psi 2, 3, 4; 
Corresponding Secretary 4; Yearbook Staff. 

HENRY N. REIS 
8B Pleasant View 
Fall River, Mass. 

Epsilon Phi Pi 1,2,3, 4, Vice President 2, Presi- 
dent 4; Tennis 2, 3, 4; Representative at Large 
Athletic and Social Union 4; Assistant Editor 
Yearbook; Bowling 2, 4. 

ROBERT F. RODMAN HI 
Lafayette, R. I. 

Phi Psi I, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Editor Yearbook; 
Dean's List 1, 2. 

SHLOMO ROSENBAUM 
L3 Shd. Yehvdith 
Montefiori Qtr. 
Tel Aviv, Israel 

AATCC 3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 3, 4; Cosmopolitan 
Club 3, 4, Secretary - Treasurer 4; A.C.S. 4; 
Soccer 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Dean's List 3. 

NORMAN J. ROY 

98 Harbor Terrace 
Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 3, 4. 



PAUL GEORGE ST. LAURENT 

475 So. Beach St. 

Fall River, Mass. 

Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; Manager Basketball 
3, 4; Distaff 3; Bowling 2, 3, 4, Bowling 5«c- 
retary 4; Yearbook Staff; Varsity Club 4. 

ROGER ALBERT SHERMAN 

1A Pleasant View 
Fall River, Mass. 

Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Student Council 
3, 4; Soccer 1, 4; Dean's List 1, 2; Varsity Club 
4; Bowling 4; New England Textile Foundation 
Scholarship 4. 

JOSEPH A. SULLIVAN JR. 

69 Brownell Lane 
Portsmouth, R. I. 

Bowling 4. 

ALAN M. SUSSMAN 
294 Barnaby St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Soccer 3, 4 ;Varsity Club 3, 4; Basketball I, 2; 

Distaff 1, 2, 3, Business Manager 2; Yearbook 

Staff, Business Manager; Bowling League I, 2, 

3, 4, Treasurer 4. 

MANUEL JOSEPH VIVEIROS 

60 Mott St. 

Fall River, Mass. 

Engineering Society I, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1; Bawl- 
ing 3, 4. 

JACK WACHSBERGER 

1545 Hewlett Ave. 
Hewlett, N. Y. 

Epsilon Phi Pi I, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 3, 4; Basket- 
ball I, 2, 3, 4; Bowling 2, 3, 4. 

NORMAN BURTON WEINSTEIN 

558 Empire Boulevard 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

AATCC I, 2, 3, 4, Chairman 4; A.C.S. I, 2, 4; 
Student Council 3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Pledgemaster 4; Bowling I, 2, 3, 4; Tennis Team 
2; Distaff 4. 

HERBERT A. WEISMAN 

1665 Andrews Ave. 

Bronx, 53, N. Y. 

Epsilon Phi Pi 3, 4; Distaff 3, 4, Business 
Manager 3, 4; Bowling I, 2, 3, 4. 

RUSSEL WILKEY 

65 Haffards St. 
Fall River, Mass. 

Yearbook Committee 

FREDERICK J. WOOD 

6 Worcester St. 
Taunton, Mass. 

Engineering Society I, 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 
2, 3, 4; Bowling 3, 4. 

WARREN MILTON WOOD 

357 Wilson Road 
Fall River, Mass. 

Dean's List I, 2, 3, 4; Engineering Society 3, 4; 
Engineering Representative Student Council 3; 
Student Aid 4. 

MENELAOS YANKOPOULOS 

142 Elm St. 

Fall River, Mass. 

Epsilon Phi Pi I, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1; Tennis 
Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; AATCC 1, 2, 3, 4. 



Junior Class 





Freshman week opened on September 1949 for the junior class. It was a week 
filled with exams and the business of getting acquainted with the people who were 
to make up our class for the next four years. We met our advisors, listened to the 
rules of the school and perspired through the classification test given on a warm 
September afternoon. The usual confusion surrounded us as we tried to find our 
classrooms and get our program settled. 

Fraternity rushing came after the exams and the fellows who joined went 
through their few days hazing. May came and our final exams. We successfully breezed 
through these and looked forward to our summer vacation and a season on the beach. 

Our sophomore year found us with a new addition on the campus, Perry's Hi- 
Class restaurant. It was the meeting place for all of us in the morning, for a cup 
of his famous coffee, and all during the day when the schedule permitted. 

There was a dark cloud hanging over our head this year, for the war 
in Korea had started. Some of the class heeded the call to the colors 
and enlisted, while the rest of us waited for the draft or tried to get into 
a reserve unit. We were all in our various departments this year and 
getting an idea of the work we would be doing for the rest of our working 
lives. 

Junior year found us upper classmen at last. Our ranks had 
dwindled however, and some of the familiar faces were no longer present. 
This year many of our members are in the clubs and on the athletic 
teams of the school. The shower room singers have a chance to use 
their voices in the glee club that was formed this year. 

We now look forward to a successful year hoping that peace returns 
to the world thereby making our education a little more secure. 



Sophomore Class 




In the month of September, 1950, there gathered together for the first time the 
class of '54. Sixty strong, we were to take our first exam of any sort within the walls 
of Durfee Teeh — the first of a long line of exams. This pre-entrance test was a type 
familiar to most and soon we were officially freshmen. Our books bought and tuitions 
paid, we were off and running. 

As usual there were a number of bewildered 'frosh' unable to link the right room 
with the right class at the right time. Then the inevitable changes came about. We 
learned which classes could be gotten to late and which could not. We found out where 
to loaf during "breaks", where to study, when the rough classes rolled around — in 
short we settled into a routine that lasted until the final exams. 

With the end of the first semester we were past the half-way mark. The mid- 
year's had left us with that glassy look but we recovered rapidly and moved into the 
home-stretch. By now everything was familiar and we knew just about everybody's 
first or last or nickname. We held a meeting to elect class officers and 
put in Gerald White as President, Paul Parente as Vice-President, 
Dorothy Zebrasky as Secretary and Stan Sieczkowski as Treasurer. The 
second half of the year seemed to go by rather quickly. We did some 
orating, memorized more dates, equations, and formulas — which we 
forgot far too easily — drew more pictures and suffered under all those 
hardships students everywhere endure, such as cramming and hour 
quizzes that take two hours to do. 

At the advent of that second year a total of thirty-five showed up 
for registration. Again the grind started — this time sooner and rougher. 
We were divided up into groups of chemists, artists, and engineers. In 
these little groups the members became closer friends because there 
was a common foe to be met. We were more worldly and sure of our- 
selves, as are all 'sophs'. Time rolled by and again we elected officers. 
Tom McCloskey as President had Dot Zebrasky to help him, Jesse Martin 
to count money and Bill Marsden as scribe. Once again the class was 
represented in all sports. Our big figure in school politics, .Miss Zebrasky, 
was elected as secretary to the Athletic and Social Union. Tests followed 
one another in rapid succession until all of a sudden Christmas was 
here again with its blessed two-week vacation. The mid-year's followed, 
new courses undertaken culminated by the almighty finals which ended 
our year with 35 hopeful beings. 




Fresh. 



man 



Cla 



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The Freshman year of the class of 1955 constituted one of the smallest enrollments 
at Bradford Dnrfee Technical Institute for a number of years. Most of the students 
were from Fall River and its surrounding area, a few ventured to us from distant places 
as; New York, Connecticut, Illinois, Rhode Island, and Tela, Honduras. 




The freshmen have yet to make their mark fully in these hallowed 
halls at Tech, but have already made their presence felt in the clubs 
and fraternities on the campus, on the athletic field, and by scholastic 
diligence. Evidence of our spirit is the forthcoming freshman dance, 
something never before undertaken by a Freshman Class. 

The class officers, who were elected on February 6, 1952, are: 

President Edward F. Mello 

Vice-President Edward Stone 

Secretary Barbara Buffo 

Treasurer Lawrence Hathaway 



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STUDENT 



ACTIVITIES 



Engineering Society 




The Engineering Society, now in its fourth year of existence, has great promise 
of becoming one of the leading organizations at Durfee Tech. Through this body, all 
engineers of the school are consolidated in the further study and promotion of practical 
engineering. 




At monthly meetings, lectures and movies provide 
valuable information upon the many operations in the 
engineering field. Friendly discussions insure harmony — 
an essential criterion in both industry and society. 

Among the aims of the group are included the 
development of the student's initiative, the encouragement 
of research, and the atlvancement of engineering. 




W5f. ^ 



The date April 12, 1948 was a milestone in the eareer of B. D. T. I. as the student 
chapter of the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists was accepted 
by the parent organization, as a full fledged member. During the early months of 
1948, a small group of students banded together and through the concerted efforts of 
all, the chapter was formed. Then through the continuous work of Mr. Wingate and 
the student members, the chapter has grown to be one of the largest organizations* 
at B. D. T. I. 



A student benefits by being a member in the following ways: (1) he receives 
journals published by the association pertaining to all the new advancements in the 
textile world; (2) he gains the privilege to go to student, sectional and national meetings 
of the association; (3) he has the privilege to use the association's employment bureau; 
and (4) he has a chance to do research in textiles and to present his findings at the 
yearly national convention. 

In the past four years, the association has heard lectures given by 
important men in the industry; shown movies about textiles; and held a 
yearly banquet in conjunction with the American Chemical Society. In 
the years '50 and '51, groups of members went to the national conventions 
at New Hampshire and New York. In 1950, Robert LcBrun, a former 
student, won a portable radio for guessing the amount of Calcium 
Chloride particles contained in a dessieator. Unfortunately in '51, no 
one was very good at guessing. 

The present officers are: Norman Weinstein, Chairman; Edward 
Macuch, Secretary; Edward Lavagnino, Treasurer; and Mr. William 
Wingate, Faculty Advisor. 




American Chemical Society 





The student affiliates of the American Chemical Society was incorporated at 
the Bradford Durfee Technical Institute in 1949, for the purpose of uniting students 
pursuing a course in chemistry leading to a bachelor of science degree. 

The A. C. S. which is the largest organization of its kind devoted to a single 
science, has made it possible for undergraduate students of chemistry to enjoy some 
of the benefits of membership in the society. 

The objects of the A. C. S. are to encourage in the broadest and most liberal 
manner the advancement of chemistry in all its branches, and to promote scientific 
interest and inquiry by means of its meetings, professional contacts, reports, paper 
discussions and publications. 

Members and affiliates regularly receive the A. C. S. publication Chemical 
and Engineering News, which keeps them abreast of current happenings in the chemical 
world. 

During the academic year, regular meetings were held by the stu- 
dent affiliates at the Fall River Public Library through the courtesy 
of the head librarian and at the school library. Some of the meetings 
were devoted entirely to business matters while the majority consisted 
of lectures by prominent executives in the field of chemistry. Some 
of the speakers who addressed the members were Dr. Karl A. Hoist 
who spoke on "The Chemistry of the Sodium Polyphosphate Glasses," 
and Mr. Raymond W. Jacoby who discussed an important aspect of 
chemistry. 

In December many of the members traveled to M. I. T. where they 
attended the annual meeting and banquet of the Northeastern Section 
of the A. C. S. 

In early May an excellent banquet was sponsored jointly by the 
A. C. S. and the A. A. T. C. C. and was enjoyed by all who attended. 
With this banquet the years activities of the A. C. S. came to a fruitful 
end. 



Cosmopolitan Club 




The Cosmopolitan Club was organized in the fall of 1946 by a group of foreign 
and native students. In keeping with its name and foresight of its pioneers, the club 
continues to have considerable success in establishing friendly relations among mem- 
bers. 

Its activities have included talks by its members on the culture of the nationalities 
they represent, motion pictures on topics leading to a unified world and regular dinner 
parties at outstanding restaurants featuring the national dishes of the countries 
represented by the members. 

This year the club is represented by students from Honduras, France, 
Israel, Portugal, Nigeria and the United States. In the recent past 
members have come from Greece, Burma, China, Peru, Puerto Rico, 
Turkey and Pakistan. 

The faculty advisors are Mr. Louis Simeone and Mr. Walter J. Cass. 

PRESENT OFFICERS 

President — Chuckwuemeka Okoye (Nigeria) 

Vice-President — Cornelius J. Murphy (United States) 

Secretary-Treasurer — Shlomo Rosenbaum (Israel) 

Historian — Al Miyoshi (United States) 

ROSTER 

Americo Almeida (Portugal) 
Thomas Lawton (United States) 
Nesri Salomon (Honduras) 
Louis Kawas (Honduras) 
Ed Lavagnino (United States) 
Phillippe Bernheim (France) 
Joseph Murphy (United States) 
Menelaos Yankopoulos (United States) 




Distaff 




The official publication of the undergraduates of Bradford Durfee Technical 
Institute, 64 Durfee Street, Fall River, Massachusetts. Published monthly during 
the college year under the auspices of the Student Union. 




EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Glenn Gellis 

Assistant Editor Dana Binkoff 

Business Manager Herbert Weisman 

Art Manager Myrabeth Weldon 

Circulation Manager Don Taylor 

Sports Editor Tom McCloskey 

Literary Editor Carolyn Brownell 

Literary Advisor Mr. Walter Cass 

Financial Advisor Prof. Rudolph LaVault 

EDITORIAL ASSOCIATES 

Gil Wallace, Archie Franco, Harold Isserlis, Earl Bilsky, Norman 
Weinstein, Tom Lavvton, Everett Arnold. 



Alethea Staff 




The aim of the 1952 Alethea has been not only to set down the important events 
of interest, but through the extensive use of color and more informal pictures with 
descriptive captions to inject into its pages some of the casual moments that if not 
permanently recorded would escape one's memory. We have tried to capture the 
importance of the 1951-52 year in the history of Bradford Durfee Technical Institute 
and to grasp the spirit of change which has dominated the Institute. 



Editor-in-Chief Robert F. Rodman 

Managing Editor Norman H. Reis 

Art Manager Patricia L. Cooper 

Art Assistants Arthur Soares, Thomas Kenney, Donald Benoit 

Business Manager Alan Sussman 

Photography Manager Omer L. Bergeron 

Literary Editor Cornelius J. Murphy 

Advertising Manager '. . . Dana H. Binkoff 

Financial Manager Joseph Raposa 

Assistants-Ernest Moniz, Roger Sherman, Emmett O'Neil, David Moito/.a, 
Russell Wilkey, Paul St. Laurent, John Rapoza, Jack Wachsberger. 




Varsity Club 




This year the Varsity Club took great strides in encouraging sports at Tech. The 
Soccer and Basketball teams, for example, under faculty coaches, displayed more 
spirit and team play than has been seen in some time. 

The Varsity Club consists of athletes who have won letters in one 
or more of the three major sports; Baseball, Basketball, or Soccer. 
The purpose of the club is to provide sweaters, award letters, and pri- 
marily to stimulate and encourage sports at Tech. Fourteen sweaters 
were awarded this year and the unusually large Freshman Class seems 
to indicate that this number is on the increase. 




The annual Thanksgiving Day naffle proved to be a tremendous 
financial success in fulfilling the club's desire to be entirely self- 
supporting. This having been accomplished, the 1952 Varsity Club has 
successfully fulfilled its obligations and purposes. 

OFFICERS 

President Ernest Howarth 

Vice-President Neil Murphy 

Secretary-Treasurer Dean Crook 

Faculty Advisor Mr. William Wingate 




Athletic 



a 



nd 



Soci.a.1 Union 



For the past tour years the Athletic and Social Union has guided 
and directed all student activities. During our years at Tech., we have 
seen the inception of the tennis, fencing, and bowling teams, the forma- 
tion of a glee club, and the inauguration of an intramural basketball 
league, through the A. and S. U's efforts. In addition, continued support 
of the three major athletic teams was administered. 



These achievements alone show the Union has done its job, and under 
the guidance of its faculty advisor, Mr. Wingate, the student elected 
officers have done their share. 

This year's officers were composed of two seniors, Cornelius Murphy, 
president; Henry Keis, representative at large; one junior, Robert 
Kenyon, vice-president; and one sophomore, Dorothy Zebrasky, secretary. 




Glee Club 




With the beginning of the 1951-1952 season, a new organization was born here 
at Tech, that is the Tech Glee Club. It is the first musical group to be introduced 
at Tech. 



The purpose of the glee club is to promote interest in music. So far 
it has been mostly organizational, but with membership increasing, we 
feel the club is here to stay. We will cover all phases of music from 
classical to the hit tunes on Broadway. 




FACULTY ADVISOR 

Mr. Kenneth Tedford 

PRESIDENT 

Menelaos Yankopoulos 

VICE PRESIDENT 

Myrbeth Weldon 

SECRETARY - TREASURER 

Carolyn Brownell 



\ 



Student Council 




The Student Council is the governing body of the Student Association and it is 
elected by the Association. The Council consists of the following members: the presi- 
dent of each of the undergraduate classes; a representative of each of the departments, 
elected by the students of the departments; and a representative-at-large elected by 
the student body. 

The purpose of the Council is to represent the interests of the student body of the 
Institute and to take any action that is necessary to preserve or further these interests. 
Among its other duties, the Council has supervisory powers over all undergraduate 
school-sponsored activities and organizations which are competitively open to any 
student. 

Since the academic year began, the Council has been drawing up a 
Constitution suitable to both the Faculty and the Student Association. 

In the Fall of 1950, a meeting of all the undergraduates of Tech was 
held and at this meeting, the Student Council was formally begun. Robert 
Staples was the first president and under his able leadership the Council 
began functioning. The primary goal of this first Student Council was 
to write the Constitution. Although its objective was not fully reached, 
it did compile the important groundwork necessary for future Councils 
to work upon. 

Aiding the efforts of the Council in the capacity of faculty advisor is 
Dr. D. Alexander Severino. 

At present, the members of the Council are: 

Senior Class President Roger Bridge 

Junior Class President Archie Soares 

Sophomore Class President Thomas McCloskey 

Freshman Class President Edward F. Mello 

Textile Department Representative Louis Fayan 

Chemistry Department Representative Norman Weinstein 

Art Department Representative Myrbeth VVeldon 

Engineering Department Representative Frank Nasser 

Representative-at-Farge Roger Sherman 






Phi Psi Fraternity was founded by five students of the Philadelphia College of 
Textile Engineering on March 18, 1903. In 1905 the fraternity was incorporated under 
the laws of the state of Pennsylvania. Delta Chapter here at B.D.T.I. was organized 
in 1909. Other chapters in addition to Alpha at Philadelphia are Beta, New Bedford 
Textile; Gamma, Lowell Textile; Eta, North Carolina State; Theta, Georgia Tech; 
Iota, Clemson; Kappa, Texas Tech; and Lambda, Alabama Polytech. 

The aims of the fraternity are to promote good fellowship, social gatherings, 
mutual advancement of its members, and the art of textile manufacturing. Phi Psi 
has the distinction of being the largest and most respected textile fraternity in the 
world. Delta Chapter exemplifies this by attempting to promote harmony among all 
school factions. 

In the past school year the fraternity has sponsored two smokers, one held in 
November for non-fraternity students which met with great success, and another 
held in the Spring for potential members. A National Convention is held annually. This 
year's convention will deal largely with the coming gala 50th Anniversary to be cele- 
brated in Philadelphia. 

Each year Beta, Gamma, and Delta Chapters meet in Boston for 
the conferring of the 'Third Degree' on their new brothers. This occasion 
gives all members both old and new as well as honorary, the opportunity 
to meet and get to know each other. The meeting also presents the 
further opportunity of exchanging ideas and views with men prominent 
in the textile field. 

The fraternity's heart was greatly saddened this year with the 
passing of Harold Hart, one of its original founders. His ceaseless efforts 
towards the promotion of our ideals will ever be remembered. 

Although the fraternity was largely dormant during the war years 
due to small classes, it has succeeded to grow in post-war years not 
only at B. D. T. I. but on a national basis to its present membership of 
2900. 

OFFICERS 

President Roger A. Sherman Secretary Joseph H. Murphy 

Vice President Louis Fayan Senior Warden Joseph D. Raposa 

Treasurer Robert F. Rodman Junior Warden Everett Arnold 

Chapter Editor John D. Rapoza 



Epsilon Phi Pi 




The school year 1950-51 was the brightest in the maturing Epsilon Phi Pi Society. 
A consistent attendance at meetings and gatherings throughout the year attested to 
the loyalty and high degree of interest the members offered to the organization. 

The Epsilon Phi Pi Fraternity, a non-sectarian professional fraternity was 
organized at the Bradford Durfee Technical Institute in 1949, and became chartered 
in the state of Massachusetts the same year. The ideals of freedom, fidelity, and 
friendship are the cornerstones upon which the fraternity is organized. Anti-discrimina- 
tion and anti-hypocracy are the columns, which support the canopy of brotherhood 
and true democracy. 

A brief glance at the record reveals unquestionable progress of the fraternity, 
typical of its dynamic approach as indicated in the charter. The efforts of the 
twenty charter members were realized in a very short time. In two years the mem- 
bership had more than doubled, even though the educational require- 
ments were increased. The third and fourth years were significant in 
that greater increases of membership were noted, with heartening in- 
dication that Epsilon Phi Pi rolls would continue to swell as the years 
progressed. 

Well organized meetings of a professional nature with lively 
discussions and group participation in activities made every member an 
active one. Men of high calibre in the educational, professional and 
business fields are honorary members — each deserve commendation for 
the support and genuine interest that they have displayed in the frater- 
nity. 

The officers: Chancellor, Norman Reis; Vice Chancellor, Cornelius 
Murphy; Bursar, John Rogers; Scribe, John Murray 3rd. Pledgemaster 
Norman Weinstein, and Historian John Burkett deserve a "WKLL 
DONE" in promoting unity and leadership. 

Beta chapter at the Philadelphia Textile Institute is a thriving 
reality, while Gamma Chapter appears as a not too distant possibility. 
Interest and inquiries about the fraternity from other colleges is in- 
dicative of healthy progress. It is through growth that the attainment 
of the ideals of the founders of Epsilon Phi Pi Fraternity rest, while 
progress in itself is a measure of the success of those ideals. 




Kappa Sigma Phi 





Functioning as a fraternal organization since May of 1950, the Gamma Chapter 
of the Kappa Sigma Phi under the guidance of Mrs. Rudolph La Vault as the advisor 
has held unswervingly to its purpose with a firm and resolute determination. 

The sorority strives with a fervent endeavor to combine in (fraternity) women of 
like interests and ambitions in the textile field with a common desire for the exchange 
of knowledge and encouragement of fine ideals and sincerity. 

Although the activities of the sorority have been constrained during the past 

year due to the increasingly small number of active members, the organization has 

sponsored many social affairs and educational lectures. Among these were a tea held 

for all non-sorority girls, a raffle with the aim to aid in sending a representative to 

a Grand Council meeting at Philadelphia Textile Institute, and a formal 

installation banquet given at the Hotel Mellen. Culminating the activities 

of the year, the sorority had the honor of installing the Delta Chapter 

at the New Bedford Textile Institute. 

The desire to bring together, in a fraternal atmosphere, women of 
similar ambitions serves as a great medium of enblazing upon their 
minds in indelible characters their experiences, both scholastic and 
social, at this institute. 

Name of Organization: Gamma Chapter of the Kappa Sigma Phi 

Date of Origin: May 30, 1950 

Officers for the past year: 

President Patricia Cooper 

Vice-President - Secretary Myrbeth Weldon 

Treasurer - Officer of Discipline Joan Seifert 



Bowling League 




The Durfee Tech Bowling League, now in its fourth season, has for its purpose 
the provision of recreation for students and faculty members. 

The elected officers arrange the schedule, plan a banquet and tabulate results 
for the purpose of awarding prizes. A trophy is given to the league champions, cash 
awards to the high single and high three. For the first time a "Booby" prize will be 
presented to the one who with faultless effort knocks down the least number of pins. 
Awards are also presented to teams with the high one game total and high three game 
total. 



The awards are presented to the individuals by Athletic Director, 
Mr. William Wingate. At the conclusion of the speeches by Mr. Wingate 
and the Officers, new officers are elected for the next year. 

A pleasant feature, which has been in existence two years, is the 
addition of an all-girl team into the league. The girls provided with a 
20 pin per string handicap, assure a threat to any team in the league 
and affords stiff competition. Another feature, is the provision of handi- 
caps during the second half. This makes for better balance and a more 
closely fought race during the remaining half. 

The league, although in its infancy, is providing another excellent 
form of extra-curricular activity for B. D. T. I. 




Fencing 





Coach Eugene R. Williams guides a group which tries to recapture some of the 
glamour, the romance, the sheer excitement and pleasure of the old-time "fight for 
blood" with none of the real danger. The cavaliers of Durfee Tech — the d'Artagnons 
of Durfee Street are finding that the sword is not something to place over the mantle 
but a weapon to be used for self-preservation. Also it is used as protection against 
a white clad duelist intent on running you through with thirty-five (35) inches of cold 
steel, trying to outwit you to score a touch. 

It is hardly possible to divorce the sport of Fencing from the grim business it 
once was. Without the canvas padding, heavy masks, and tipped weapons, one would 
suffer the penalty for a slip or lack of practice by receiving a slit forearm, a hacked 
neck, or a hole in the chest, all real "touches." 

Even with the loss of many of the members from last year, this year 
started with a good turnout and a lot of enthusiasm in the preparation 
for the matches of February and March. Led by Co-captains Harold 
Isserlis and Joseph Murphy, coach Williams' three weapon team (Foil, 
Epee, and Sabre) met this season in intercollegiate competition the var- 
sity teams of M. I. T., Boston University, University of Connecticut, and 
Clark University, and the freshman team of Harvard University, the 
last being held in Fall River. 

Many of the team members in addition to fencing in intercollegiate 
competition joined along with coach Williams in the Amateur Fencers 
of America and had an opportunity to enter individual competition with 
some of the best fencers in the country. 

Visitors, members-to-be, anyone may come to the Salle d'Armes on 
the third floor of the Y.M.C.A. and watch the activity, join the group, 
and have fun. 

The Fencing Team of Bradford Durfee Technical Institute: 

THE FOIL TEAM 
Harold Isserlis (Co-capt), Mario Antonelli, Edward Stone, Walter Rak 

THE EPEE TEAM 

Joseph Murphy (Co-capt), John Murray III, Donald Benoit 

THE SABRE TEAM 

Courtney Reed, Franklin Raposa, Frank Labounty, Marshall David 



Soccer 




The 1951 soccer season has shown a highly improved Tech team. With very few 
veterans at hand, Coach Lou Simeone started the season losing to Bridgewater State 
Teachers College in the closing minutes of the game. The next two Saturdays saw the 
blue-jacketed engineers lose another pair of close games to New England College and 
Rhode Island College of Education, respectively. Play was more systematic in these 
tussles, but did not exclude individuality, class, aggressiveness or control. These factors 
led the squad to its first victory over Bridgewater on the Tech home field, by the score 
of 3 to 1. 

The seasons worst defeat for the booters was suffered at the hands of a very 
strong New Bedford Textile squad, led by a talented group of South Americans. 
Vindication came for the team from Tech in the return match which ended in a tie. 
This was indeed the crowning accomplishment of the 1951 season and in some 
measures made up for only a mediocre season. 

Fresh from this moral victory, the Techites travelled to Boston to 
meet the Suffolk University squad and turned in a smooth performance 
in downing the Hubmen. The seasons finals saw St. George's of 
Newport resoundingly overwhelmed by the engineers. 

It is somewhat difficult to single out any individual stars. However, 
Nesri Salamon, the freshman "ball juggler" from Central America, 
who carried with him all the equipment of a fine athlete, was the high 
scorer for the season. Everest Correa was outstanding in his function as 
team captain. 

Complete team roster: 
Seniors — Shlomo Kosenbaum, Doc Sherman, Alan Sussman, Walter Kak, 

Kay Hryciw, Joe Raposa, Ev Arnold, Dana Binkoff, Neil Murphy, 

Ev Correa. 
Juniors — Jim Curtis, Bob Kenyon. 
Sophomores — Paul Parente. 
Freshmen — Nesri Salamon, Don Halforth, Dave Hathaway, Marshal 

David, Al Champoux. 
Managers — Ed Levell, Ernest Howarth. 




Basketball 





With three varsity men graduated last year Coach John Greenhalgh had to depend 
upon his three veterans, Neil Murphy, Emmett O'Neil and Joe Gardella, for the back- 
bone of his 1951-52 squad. The coach a firm believer in hard work and aggressiveness, 
chose for his team only those who demonstrated these qualities through the weeks 
of strenuous practice. 

The team was represented by only two members of this year's graduating class, 
in the persons of Co-captains Neil Murphy and Emmett O'Neil. A most pleasent 
suprise was the presence of talented freshman, who composed two-thirds of the start- 
ing five, and offers pleasing memories in years to come. 

Neil Murphy led all scorers with an overall total of 218 points. 
Emmett O'Neil came next with 158, followed by Joe Gardella 148, Jeff 
O'Brien 105, Al White 102, and Dean Crook 88. 

The highlights of the season were victories over the rival Textile 
schools, New Bedford and Lowell. Stonehill College won the Conference 
championship, and Tech and New Bedford came in second with identical 
3-3 record in league play. 

The team ended the season with a record of: 7 won, 8 lost. 



Tech 

55 Alumni 

52 Otis Air Force 
72 Bridge water 
70 New Bedford 
66 Gordon 

53 Lowell 

56 Naval Training Station 
61 Bridgewater 



Opponent 


Tech Opponent 


53 


45 


Naval Training Station 69 


77 


40 


Stonehill 96 


55 


96 


Gordon 88 


61 


50 


Stonehill 84 


71 


48 


New Bedford 50 


39 


88 


Curry 67 


ition 67 


72 


Hillyer 74 



Tennis 




The Tennis Club showing fine sportsmanship has earned the highest respect and 
ranks among the finest competitive sports at B. D. T. I. The squad has a season 
schedule of eight matches and is now a member of the newly formed Southeastern 
Massachusetts Coastal Conference. In its 1950-51 season the squad, suffering from 
lack of experienced letter men, gained but two victories, both of which came at the 
expense of Bridgewater State Teachers' College. 



President Menelaos Yankopoulos 

Secretary George Plante 

Coach Mr. John Greenhalgh 



1952 TEAM ROSTER 



Menelaos Yankopoulos 
Jack Wachsberger 
Dana Binkoff 



Henry Reis 

George Plante 

Joseph Raposa - Student Manager 



1952 SCHEDULE 



April 


16 


April 18 


April 


28 


May 


1 


May 


5 


May 


13 


May 


16 



Bryant College 

Bridgewiater State Teachers College 

Stonehill College 

Bryant College 

Bridgewater State Teachers College 

New Bedford Textile Institute 

New Bedford Textile Institute 

Stonehill College 



At Bryant 

At Bridgewater 

At Stonehill 

At Home 

At Home 

At Home 

At New Bedford 

At Home 




Baseball 







The Baseball squad opened with a bang winning their first 3 games, then faded out 
and lost 3 of the next 4 to end up with a 4-3 record. Art Ryan and Roger Larivee 
led the pitching staff with all four wins obtained between them, but they couldn't hit 
the plate in the out-of-town games of which Tech lost 3 out of 3. 

Rookies for the Tech team were Stan Sieczkowski, one of the best hitters for 

B. D. T. I., Joe Gardella, outstanding speedy shortshop, Frank Nasser, who held the 

team together behind the plate, and John Osborne, Freshman basketball 

and baseball player. Catcher Frank Nasser fractured his thumb at the 

Stonehill game and was out of action for the rest of the year. 

Outstanding hitters for Tech were Harry Hodkinson, left fielder, 
Stan Sieczkowski, 3rd baseman and Archie Franco, 1st baseman, with 
Sieczkowski and Archie Soares also outstanding on defense. 

SQUAD 




Ted Williamson 


Roger Larivee 


Stan Sieczkowski 


Harry Hodkinson 


Archie Franco 




Bill O'Neil 


Art Ryan 




Paul Parente 


Joe Gardella 




Neil Murphy 


Emmett O'Neil 




John Osborne 


Norm Lafond 




Archie Soares 


Vic Wojick 


SCHEDULE 


Frank Nasser 


Tech 




Opponent 


6 


Curry 


3 


8 


Stonehill 


2 


11 


New Bedford Textile 


6 


5 


Bridgewater 


6 


7 


Bridgewater 


4 


5 


Stonehill 


8 


1 


New Bedford Textile 


7 




CANDID 




'Cramming' 




'A New Toy' 





'Nature Study' 




'Will It Work' 



The Bull Session' 




7200 Hook Nite Mare" 




'See B. B. H. 




'Man vs. Skein' 




'Short Circuit" 




'Les Beaux Arts" 




'Stalemate' 



Sports 



Short 



s 






Sports 
Shorts 








Junior Class Officers 










' jj :- 


ft f *J?< - A 


jjii Elftk "' 


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if - ^ 


WSr |__ t-jKJyP^^ "221 



'Long Reach' 



'Office Staff 





The Cage' 



'Voices ? ? ?" 




Bobby Reis 
Class "72" 




'X + Y 5" 




Daddy Reis 
Class "52" 




John Rapoza and Wife 






'Dye Hard" 




"Art" 






H Sr H .- 1 




' it 

ill 


III l*-*l 


11 


' 


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1 I ' mmmH 


r#ihs 


»,. 


fftfe^ 


I \ J, i ' i aHH 


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lg* , 


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'.pi* 


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'Inspired' 






'Man of Leisure' 



. 




'Faded' 





'Switch On' 



'Switch Off 




'Complete Circuit' 




'Study Hour" 




The Finish" 




'Any Last Request?' 




'Getting the Twist' 




a 



Tech Brewery' 



Acknowledgements 

The publication of the many individual and collective contribu- 
tions that are a part of a yearbook such as the Alethea, commands the 
appreciation and gratitude of the editors to all who assisted in its con- 
summation. We sincerely thank: 

The efficient and zealous staff of the Alethea, who worked on 
the preparation, ad-seeking, layout, writing, editing, and proofreading 
of every page. 

Dr. D. Alexander Severino and Mr. Kenneth C. Tedford our art 
advisors, whose decisions, suggestions, and advice regarding our lay- 
out, photography, and art work vitally affected the inspired appearance 
of this yearbook. 

Mr. William Wingate and Mr. Louis S. Simeone who encouraged 
us with good counsel. 

Mr. Samuel A. Stone and the College Bookstore who provided 
us with an efficient means of distributing the Alethea. 

Mr. Bruce Dean White who contributed much advice on the 
choice of photographs. 

Miss Fidelia D. Davol, Miss Margaret E. Morgan, and Miss 
Jacqueline P. Urban who kindly supplied information and help when- 
ever required. 

Franklin Printing House whose technical information and ex- 
perience and patience were relied upon countless times during the 
planning and publication of the Alethea. 

The faculty of B. D. T. I. for their kind tolerance of the many 
class interruptions so that we might take pictures. 

The Sophomore and Junior advertising classes who contributed 
their help in every way possible whenever possible. 

Our advertisers who so substantially contributed to the success 
of the yearbook. Please give them your consideration whenever the 
opportunity arises. 



msi. 







mm 



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THE FACT that this company was selected to 
design and make the engravings for this book and 
many other prominent Annuals, is significant that 
we are New England's leading Designers and 
Engravers of school and college publications. 




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Personal Cards 

Club Insignia — Medals and Trophies 

Represented by 

TOM G A LV I N 

Attleboro Office 



Compliments of 



DodgeviUe Finishing Company 



INCORPORATED 



DodgeviUe, Massachusetts 



check your 
textile chemical 
needs with 
Warwick's important 
series of ( 

chemical specialties V 
for the 
textile industry 



A 







Warwick technical 
advisors, with 
their wide 
knowledge of 
textile chemicals 
and processes, 
are available for 
consultation. 



WARWICK 



CHEMICAL 
COMPANY 



ANTILUSTROLE* dui.T, 



APPRAMINE* 



cationic softeners 



A.1 r RE 1 OL>E anionic softeners 



EUMERCIN* 



mercerizing assistants 



FORM ASET* textile resins 



IMPREGNOLE* and NORANE* water r.p.n.nu 

LANOLE* tar and gr 



grease removers 



ORGANOSOL 



coatings for textiles and paper 



r JL».f\o 1 l^W-Li for coating and molding 



SETOLE* 



textile resins 



SULFANOLE* synthetic detergents 



WARCOFIX* co.or fixatives 



WARCO GFI* gas fading inhibitor 



WARCOLENE* finishing n. 



WARCONYL* fire retardant, 



WARCOSAN* 



wetting and rewetting agents 



WARCOSOL* penetrants 



WEAVE-LOK*non.slip finish 



'* 



SUNTONE 

pigment printing colors for textiles and plastics 



WARWICK CHEMICAL COMPANY, DIVISION 




10th STREET and 44th AVENUE, LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK 



ris u • pat. orr. 



One Of The Oldest Young Companies 

The modern dyestuff industry was bom in 1856 when Perkin discovered ac- 
cidentally that the oxidation of aniline yielded a beautiful violet color. Within 
three years of that revolutionary event began the successful career of Geigy 
as dyestuff makers. Since 1859 Geigy has been a constant, important contributor 
to the science, technology and manufacture of synthetic organic chemicals. 
Many important developments have come from Geigy Research, among which 
have been DDT Insecticides, Mitin Mothproofer, the Solophenyl and Cupro- 
phenyl Colors, Erio Chrome and Polar Colors, and the first powdered colors for 
acetate yarns— the Cetacyl Direct Colors. In addition, many highly effective 
processes and outstanding mill auxiliary products have been developed. 

This vast store of experience and knowledge is immediately available for every 
new problem that confronts the user of dyestuffs and auxiliaries. Geigy quality 
products and thorough service will help you to succeed in the job for which you 
have been so ably trained. 



<ww 



Established 1764 
Dyestuff Makers Since 1859 

Originators of DDT Insecticides 
oystuH Makers sine, i $59 and MITIN, the Durable Mothproofer 



DYESTUFFS 
for Textile Dyeing and Printing 



NOVA CHEMICAL CORPORATION 

147 - 53 Waverly Place New York 14, N. Y. 

Warehouses in New York, Charlotte, N. C. and Greenville, S. C. 



+ 



Selling agents for 

METRO DYESTUFF CORPORATION 

Plant: West Warwick, Rhode Island 




fc....... 



PAROUTE® 

A dust-free, white crystalline reduc- 
ing agent. Soluble, colorless, excel- 
lent for stripping wool rags, shoddy, 
acetate or Nylon fabric. 



© 



CASTROLITE 

A highly sulphonated castor oil used 
as a staple penetrant for dyeing or 
bleaching in leading textile mills. 



DRYTEX® 

A high-test wax emulsion type water 
repellent finish having extreme sta- 
bility both in the barrel and in di- 
luted form as used. Non-foaming. 



For brighter vat dyed colors on cot- 
ton, linen and rayon. Use this pow- 
erful concentrated reducing agent 
for faster, cleaner results on wool, 
cotton and rayon. 



NEOZYME© 

Concentrated low temperature de- 
sizing enzyme. Removes starch and 
gelatine. Excellent for eliminating 
thickeners from printed goods at 
low temperature. 



ZIPOLITE© 

Very efficient detergent with high 
wetting power. Effective in neutral, 
acid or alkaline bath. Dyeing assist- 
ant having good dispersing and 
leveling properties. 



DISPERSALL 

Effective retardent for dyeing vat 
colors. Dispersing and leveling qual- 
ities, useful in wool and acetate 
dyeing. Valuable auxiliary in strip- 
ping vat colors, naphthols. 



A concentrated reducing agent, 
highly stable at high temperatures, 
outstanding for discharge printing. 
Employed successfully wherever the 
reducing agent must dry into the fab- 
ric and retain its reducing power. 



NEOZYME©HT 

Concentrated high temperature de- 
sizing enzyme. Removes both starch 
and gelatine. Suitable for continu- 
ous pad-steam method. Remarkable 
stability at very high temperatures. 



VELVORAY® 

A blend of vegetable oils and spe- 
cially selected fats for a superior, 
non-foaming, finishing oil. High in 
combined SO3 and stability. Excel- 
lent for sanforizing. 




\ S N^V X 



©0lT7t- 



m 






NEOWET 

Permits effective wetting at all tem- 
peratures—particularly useful with 
enzymatic desizing agents. No re- 
action to soft or hard water. Not 
affected by either acid or alkali 
chemicals. 



W^V^4* 





CARLTON HIU, NEW JERSEY 




iVI»* 



Compliments of 



Michel's Bridal Salon 



Compliments of 



VARA CONSTRUCTION CO. 



PHI PSI FRATERNITY 



Bradford Durfee Technical Institute 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Bradford Durfee Technical Institute 




It's a better than even chance... 



. . . that you who have special preparatory training 
will become the textile executives of tomorrow . . . 
and because of this, Stowe-Woodward has a genuine 
interest in you who are graduating. 

Long before you reach the position that goes with 
that big mahogany desk and its inviting swivel 
chair, you will have learned a good deal about 
Stowe-Woodward Rubber Covered Rolls and their 
importance in the textile industry. 

When you've arrived , you will also know that Stowe- 
Woodward is a pretty dependable source of help 
on any textile problem involving the use of rubber 
covered rolls. By then, we'll know you, too. 

Right now, we'd like to extend congratulations for 
a good start and our best wishes for your success. 



rubber covered rolls 



STOWE-WOODWARD, inc 



fme/ttft 



NEWTON UPPER FALLS 64, MASS. 



10 






In chemistry, too . . . 
strong links mean 
better chains. 





To insure the strongest 

B.O.N and NAPHTHOL 

Links in the chain of 
manufacture from crude 
to finished pigments . . . 

Insist on 

BETA OXY NAPHTHOIC ACID 
and NAPHTHOLS 

manufactured by 




RIDGEFI&D 



NEW JERSEY 



Southern Represented* — Dyer S- Moss Co. , Chor/ofre, N. C 



Tex-Ckem Company 



TEXTILE, CHEMICALS and SPECIALTIES 



20-21 Waganaw Road 



Fair Lawn, New Jersey 



HAwthorne 7-3344 



Cable Address TEXKEMCO 



Compliments o f 



TALBOT 
Woo/ Combing Co. 



Norton, Massachusetts 



As you enter mill life you will do well to learn all 
about Reiner equipment, its mill-proven record of 
all around excellence. The Reiner production pro- 
gram covers a wide range of machines - all top 
performers in their field. As your responsibilities 
grow with the years and decisions have to be made 
- remember Reiner for trouble-free, highest speed 
quality production in the fields listed below: 

High Speed Tricot Machines 

Simplex Tricot Machines 

Kayloom Machines 

Raschel Machines 

Full width and sectional Warpers 

Creels of all types 

Auto Heelers 

Full Fashioned Hosiery Machines up to 66 Gauge 

Automatic Bobbin Winding Machines 

(for Quilting and Stitching Machines) 
Automatic Shuttle Embroidery Machines 10 and 15 yards 

Robert Reiner, Inc. 

550 - 64 Gregory Avenue 
Weehawken, New Jersey 

— 10 Minutes by bus from Times Square — 
— Makers of Quality Textile Machinery since 1903 — 



Compliments of 




€&tKA/ube^ 



PRODUCERS OF 




FINE COMBED COTTONS 


FOR 


WEARING APPAREL 




AND HOME FURNISHINGS 


BROADCLOTHS 


BATISTES HANDKERCHIEFS 


DIMITIES 


ORGANDIES MARQUISETTES 


LAWNS 


VOILES DOTTED and PLAIN 



^L^jetxA&foe^ 



FINE SPINNING ASSOCIATES INC. 

Turks Head Building, Providence, R. I. 40 Worth Street, New York, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



FALL RIVER GLASS CO., Inc. 



296 SPRING STREET 



Showroom — 412 Second Street 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 



O'NEILS FISK TIRE SERVICE Inc. 



276 CENTRAL STREET 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 



ANDREWS & RAMBSBOTTOM Inc. 



Cotton 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 



MEMPHIS, TENN. 



Compliments of 



Birtwell Stafford 



Madison F. Welsh 



George E. Kay 



For Unbroken Continuity 
Of Service - - 

JOHNSON 

WARP 

SIZERS 

Are Known And Used By Efficient Mills 

Throughout The World 

They're good for long years of continuous, 
trouble-free sizing of delicate warps, with 
few broken ends and an absolute minimum 
of mechanical adjustments or parts re- 
placements. 

The Ultimate In Slzer Design 

CHARLES B. JOHNSON 

PIERCY AND HDLSMAN STREETS 
PATERSDN . NEW JERSEY 

Representative — J. S. FALLOW & CO., New Bedford, Mass. 



Compliments of 



THE COLLEGE BOOKSTORE 



Compliments of 



BUILDING MATERIALS INC. 



139 Front Street 



Fall River, Mass. 



BESSE-RUSSE LL'S 

MEN'S AND BOYS' 

Clothing and Furnishings 

221-223 South Main Street 
Fall River, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



REGAL FLOOR COVERING INC. 



152 North Main Street Fall River, Mass. 



MASON FURNITURE SHOWROOMS 

Plymouth Ave- and Rodman St. 
Fall River, Massachusetts 

Open from nine to nine 



Compliments of 


ABBOTT MACHINE CO., INC. 


Wilton, New Hampshire 


Southern Dffice - Greenville, S. C. 


+ 


Manufacturers of Textile Winding Machinery 


C o m p I i m cuts of 


MO N T AU P 


HOTEL MELLEN 


Sand, Gravel and Construction Corp. 




Swansea, Massachusetts 


Fall River, Massachusetts 


F- R. 2-0851 4-1362 


C o m j> I i in c n I s o f 


BROW'S DRUG STORE 




Charles F. Brow, Pharmacist 


STATE LUNCH 


Prescriptions 




127 STAFFORD ROAD 




Tels. 6-8372 2-9183 



Compliments of 



DTVCOBS 




TURANO WEINSTEIN 



Modern Reliable Shearers 



Shearing, Grooving and Plucking on all Furs 



208 West 29th Street New York 1, N. Y. 



ATLANTIC CHEMICAL CO. 



Mfg. of Textile Specialties 



Detergents - Resins 



Wetting Agents - Water Repellents 



Congratulations to the 



1952 Graduates 



EPSILON PHI PI FRATERNITY 



Compliments of 



DURO FINISHING CO. 



C o m p I i m e n t s of 



R. A. WILCOX COMPANY 



School Supplies 



C o m p I i m e n t s of 



SUSSMAN'S SURPLUS STORE 



274 SPRING STREET 



Fall River, Massachusetts 



High Point, North Carolina 

Granby, Quebec Torino, Italy 

Mexico D. F., Mexico 



€©LL©HPS 

INCORPOR AT ED 



394 Frelinghuysen Ave. Newark 5, N. J. 



m Tyn'ulsL o^PM 




368 South Main Street, 



C o m p I i m e n t s of 



Myer Jaffe 



tehedco and Southern 



PRODUCE THE B x 

pet ie n ang*e fSKtte a 
Lined '«* e "* Harness 
J^^ldCthetn C*e 
J^Ttest) Shucks «e 

that "Weave the 
I Needs'." , _. w En- 

ameers io l 
L lour miU problems 



■--^" 





flllllilllllllll!t!l!ill i l'l l '' ll ^1 |1 f l|l|l i ll||l|lillNlllllllll l 1| ! | ' l l 1, tl II 



STEEL HEDDLE MFG. CO. 

2100 W. ALLEGHENY AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA 32, PA. 

Other Offices and Plants: Greenville, S.C. Atlanta, Ga. Greensboro, N.C. Providence, R.I. 

SOUTHERN SHUTTLES 
Paris Plant . . . Greenville, S.C. A Division of STEEL HEDDLE MFG. CO. 
STEEL HEDDLE COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED 
310 St. Hubert Street, Granby, Quebec, Canada 



I l_ 20 



Over 20,000,000 "joint-use" poles, spaced about 125 feet apart, 
carry both electric and telephone lines throughout the United States. 

■ Ik 




DOES TWO JOBS AT ONE TIME 

New De-Sizing Powder Converts Both 
Starches and Proteins in One Operation! 

Amprozyme does two jobs better, faster and cheaper. 
It eliminates the guess work from de-sizing by digest- 
ing either starches or proteins, or both, at the same 
time and in the same operation. If the size is starch, 
Amprozyme's emylolytic enzymes go right to work. 
If a protein size is present, its proteolytic enzymes 
start attacking. Amprozyme insures rapid and com- 
plete de-sizing of cottons, rayons, and mixed goods, 
resulting in a good hand and uniform ground for per- 
fect dyeing, without streaks or shading. Amprozyme 
eliminates the necessity for two different agents or 
two separate operations, thus reducing storage, han- 
dling, and shipping costs. It can be utilized at normal 
or elevated dyebox temperatures, in a wide pH range. 
Amprozyme also remains stable longer. Detailed in- 
formation and a sample for a test run are available 
upon request. 



Plants: Passaic, N. J. 

Carlstadt. N. J. 

Los Angeles, California 





PASS AIC.N. J. 



DIRECTORY LISTINGS 



COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

D. DIXON DONOVAN 

656 Thames Street 
Newport, K. I. 

BROUGHTON CLEANSERS 
553 South Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

CASCADE DRUG CO. 

411 South Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

GELL MOTOR SALES INC. 
514 County Street 
Somerset, Mass. 

BIJOU RESTAURANT 
162 North Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

HALLS MUSIC STORE 
168 North Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

EAGLE RESTAURANT 

33 North Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

GERALD SCHNABEL 

2515 Glenwood Road 
Brooklyn 10, N. Y. 

COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

CENTRAL LUNCH 

354 Central Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

PLEASANT MOTORS 

2096 Pleasant Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

R. L. PAQUIN CO. 

76 Child Street 
Warren, R. I. 

BRAYTON & FERGUSON, INC. 
Cotton Brokers 

COOK BORDEN LUMBER CO. 

Davol Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

AL & EDDIE'S VARIETY 
344 Cambridge Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



A CAREER IS DPEN 

A Career in Textile Testing, Development and Research is open to 
members of this Graduating Class of Bradford Durfee Technical Institute. 
The United States Testing Company— the largest textile Testing Laboratory 
in this country— needs sound, capable textile school graduates as fabric tech- 
nicians, dye chemists and microscopists. 

Not only is a successful career in laboratory fields offered but association 
with the United States Testing Company can be the basis for a great technical 
career in textile manufacturing and processing, and allied industries. 

You are invited to write to the Personnel Director. 

United States Testing Company, Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1BBD 

HOBDKEN, NEW JERSEY 

New York, N. Y. Chicago, 111. 

Boston, Mass. Memphis, Tenn. 

Providence, R. I. Dallas, Texas 

Philadelphia, Pa- Los Angeles, Calif. 



Defiance Blea.ch.ery 

FINISHERS OF THE FINER FABRICS 
Craftsmen of the Hereblein Process in Permanent Organdies 



40 Worth Street Barrowsville 

New York Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



Edward M. Corbett, Architect 

49 Purchase Street 



and 



Samuel T. Dubitsky, Architect 

41 North. Main Street 



H. & N. Chemical Co. 

Manufacturing Chemists 



88 BLEEKER STREET 
PATERSON 4, N. J. 

Everon Marking Tubes 

(Permanent Textile Identification) 

DETERGENTS 

FINISHES 

RESINS 

Special Products Made To Order 



C o m p I i m e nt s of 



River edge Printers, Inc. 

Textile Screen Printing 



Plant: 

206 GLOBE MILLS AVENUE 

Fall River, Massachusetts Telephone 3 5886 



+ 



New York Office: 

1450 BROADWAY 

New York 18, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7710 



Compliments oi 




Fall River Textile Manufacturing Association 


CURTIS and MARBLE 


C o m p I im e nt s of 


MACHINE CO. 




Builders of 


ANDERSON & CLAYTON 


Preparing, Blending and Picking Machines, 




Cloth Room Machinery for cotton, rayons, etc. 


Cotton Brokers 


Finishing Machinery for woolens and wor- 
steds, carpets, felts, corduroys and pile fabrics. 








Best Wishes to Tech's Grads 


Write for our new, fully illustrated 




Catalog of Cotton Machinery No- 7-51 


PETROSSO BARBER SHOP 


Main Office and Plant: 


Armand Petrosso, Proprietor 


72 Cambridge St., Worcester, Mass 


WEBCO BUILDING 


Southern Office: 

1000 Woodside Bldg., Greenville, S. C. 


272 CENTRAL ST. FALL RIVER 



Plymouth. 


+ 


Printing 


Fall River 


Company 






Herald News 


+ 




90 POCASSET STREET 


+ 


Fall River, Massachusetts 




CHINA ROYAL 






Compliments of 


The Most Modern American and Chinese 




Restaurant in the City 




Air Conditioned 


DURFEE BOWLING ALLEYS 


26 NORTH MAIN STREET 




Fall River, Massachusetts 




Telephone 4-2310 




C o mp I i m e n t s of 


C o m p I i m e n t s of 


RODMAN MFG. CO. 


THE CASABLANCA 



K^ompiimentd of 



uanamia s^ompanu 



L^alco L^hemicai oLJ\ 



wiAion 



esDueAtuPf ^Department 
d5ound (j5rooKy r few Aer&eu 



MORRISON MACHINE COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS DF TEXTILE 



DYEING, FINISHING AND PROCESSING MACHINERY 



OFFICE AND WORKS PATERSON, NEW JERSEY 



CO 

Ilumidifiealion • Cooling 

and Air Conditioning 

Because Amco installs both ductless and 
duct systems, Amco engineers can be re- 
lied on to give sound, impartial advice. 

If a modern, efficient humidihcaiion sys- 
tem is already in operation and COOL- 
ING is desired, an Amco engineer will 
probably point out the advantages of an 
Amco ductless system in which nothing 
is discarded and only modest addition to 
existing humidiiication need be made. 

On the other hand, if a unit duct or a 
central station air conditioning system 
is called for, Amco can handle that job, 
loo. 

In either case, reliable, unbiased advice 
and the installation of a modern, depend- 
able system are assured. 

AMERICAN MOISTENING COMPANY 

250 West Exchange St., Providence, R. L 

Affiliated with Grinnell Company, Inc. 
Atlanta — Boston — Camden — Charlotte 



Compliments of 



Bristol 



Knitting 



Mill 



Running Mates for 
Increased Production 



Automatic 

};■■;■ #-.:;3|§§& 

♦- • Watson - Williams / 
, , Pick and Pick Shuttles i 

Wmmi 



Pick and Pick 



111 
III 



AND 



HH 



Automatic Shuttles 

III 

ton W-3, C-4 and C-5 
Convertible Looms 



I 




■ m 
1 1 




"/- 



Watson-Williams Pick 
and Pick Shuttles (at I 
right), to hold a 9%" 
paper tube, are popular 
on W-3, C-4 and C-5 
Convertible Looms. 



On these looms operating automatically, 
weavers choose Watson-Williams Automatic 
Bobbin-Changing Shuttles (at left) which 
hold 8%" bobbins. 



Watson - Williams Mfg. Co. 

Millbury ■ Massachusetts 

Northern Representative : 

Guy C. Burbank 

32 Beaconsfield Road 

Worcester 2, Mass. 



Compliments of 



Coca-Cola Bottling Company 



f 



Fall River, Massachusetts 



1244 Davol Street 



PIRES HARDWARE 



1556 - 1558 NORTH MAIN STREET 



Fall River, Mass- 



Tel. 6-8161 



/. F. MORIN FURNITURE STORE 



46 MAIN ROAD 



North Tiverton, R. I. 



MADE RITE POTATO CHIP CO. 



SOUTH MAIN STREET 



Fall River, Massachusetts 



F. H. KINGSLEY CO. 



687 DAVOL STREET 



Fall River, Massachusetts 



MODERN FURNITURE CO. 



SOUTH MAIN STREET 



Fall River. Massachusetts 



C o m )) I i »i e " t s o f 



A FRIEND 



Autographs 



Autographs 







. \ 



e » 






-